14/08/2021 ….. Jam Patch, Nth Lake Grace to Minnivale

Minnivale NR, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Road Trip, Western Australian Orchids

Waking up to the sound of nature is an amazing experience. After breakfast we break camp and head straight to Kulin, to fuel up. Then we make our way to the Macrocarpa Wildflower Trail just out of town on the Corrigin Road. As usual we drive around the trail stopping as we spot an orchid and then one of us is usually walking it as well. The first orchid for the day is the ever reliable Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva) which starts it’s season in August.

Next up some bright colours grab our attention. The Little pink fairy (Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans) stand out in the grey green colours of the surrounding scrub. Further specimens are found further around the trail, though I will record photos of each type only once, to minimise the size of this post.

Further along the small spider orchids start to appear. They do appear to be various species so will attempt to group them into separate lots. The first ones I’ll name are the Chameleon spider orchid (Caladenia dimidia) which is a variable coloured wispy type of spider orchid. The ones found and posted below are a creamy white, yellowish in colour with drooping sepals

Next up though is the Green spider orchid (Caladenia falcata) which was previously named the Fringed mantis orchid. These orchids are found between Wongan Hills and Jerramungup and have distinctive upswept narrowly clubbed lateral sepals.

Another small spider orchid, this time possibly the Joseph’s spider orchid (Caladenia polychroma) is found. As both the Chameleon and Joseph’s spider orchids are variably coloured I used the broader labellum to identify these ones as Joseph’s spider orchids.

In the middle of all these spider orchids we do find some small Hairy-stemmed snail orchids (Pterostylis setulosa). These little guys are the most common, inland, snail orchid being found between Kalbarri and Balladonia.

Also discovered was the Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata) which is another common inland orchid. This orchid is a monotypic genus endemic to Western Australia. This means it is the only species in the genus Ericksonella.

Final orchid of the location was the small Frog greenhood (Pterostylis sargentii), which has recently been split into two species. The distinctive labellum is actually different between the two types. Some of the ones found have spikes to their appearance which I have not seen before.

I will post photos of Wispy style spider orchids found but I cannot name them with any certainty. So much variation in appearance with these little spider orchids makes it very difficult to ID them.

It is now after 12 so we had better keep moving as we still have a long way to travel today. Unfortunately, Deb starts to feel unwell so we end up driving directly to Minnivale, our planned destination for today, with no further stops for orchid searches. After reaching Minnivale and with the help of our friends Bob and Jan we set up camp. I then take a late afternoon stroll into the Minnivale Nature Reserve to see if I could find anything.

I come across some Frog greenhoods hiding in the undergrowth as well as some Hairy-stemmed snail orchids. Then after some 20 mins I finally found a new orchid for the day. From the lateral sepals being prominently reflexed I believe I have found the Dainty donkey orchid (Diuris refracta). It is recorded as being in the Dowerin local government area by Florabase.

Time to end the day in the company of good friends. Other friends arrive later, including Richard, our regular travelling companion. We hit the sack after a long day traveling with the knowledge we have got so much more to come.