29/07/2020 ….. Dempster Head and Myrup

Dempster Head, Esperance, Myrup, Western Australian Orchids

On my planned RDO I revisit Dempster Head (Mud Map SE 34), this time in the company of my dearest Deb, who only has the morning free, due to her night shift roster. We head off in the direction of the helmet orchids and like my last visit the snail orchids are first orchids found. ID again up in the air.

Then Deb finally gets to see the little Crystal helmet orchids (Corybas limpidus) in flower at Dempster Head. We visit two of my three known locations and capture some more photos of theses small orchids.

Also found were Mosquito orchids (Cyrtostylis robusta) in various locations along the track. I used a nearby rock once to assist with focusing, as the overcast day made focusing on these small orchids rather difficult.

Deb then finds some shell orchids in flower… So Happy as it has been a few years since we last found them on Dempster Head. The Curled-tongue shell orchid (Pterostylis rogerii) is a southern coastal shell orchid found between Binningup and Esperance. The rosettes of unflowering orchids are commonly found with only a few orchids flowering usually located. Oddly enough flowering shell orchids lack that same rosette.

A small patch of yellow catches our eye and we are rewarded with finding the Spectacled donkey orchid (Diuris conspicillata) which is geographically restricted to coastal granite outcrops near Esperance. The dark markings on the labellum lateral lobes are said to give the orchid the impression it is wearing spectacles.

After nearly 2 hours searching for orchids it time to head home so Deb can have a rest before her shift starts at 2pm.

To get the most out of my RDO, after Deb heads off to work, I decide to go check out another location close to town. We refer to this spot as our Myrup location. Parking up just after 3pm I am shocked to find that someone had decided to dump a large amount of household rubbish in the bush, rather than pay at the Shire refuse site. Some people make you shake your head in their total disrespect for the environment. To add to this horror the Shire has also graded the road verges and widened the road so a lot of gravel and destroyed vegetation has just been pushed onto the vegetated verge.

It is right on the edge of this devastation that I come across some beautiful Esperance king spider orchids (Caladenia decora) flowering in various colours. Some may actually be hybrids with the Esperance white spider orchids or similar.

Across the road I come across many more in flower, with more still to come, given they are recorded as flowering from mid-August to October.

In the middle of these large bright king orchids I come across some small white spider orchids. The Common spider orchid (Caladenia varians) is a widespread orchid occurring between Kalbarri and Esperance. These little guys were definitely dwarfed by the large Esperance king spider orchids.

A successful RDO spent searching for orchids now comes to an end. Work tomorrow 😦

Searching between the Showers

Day Trip, Myrup

20/07/2019

Today I head east to check our how the orchid season in the southeast coast of WA is progressing. As it is winter I expect to be exploring in between rain showers.

My first stop is a bitumen dump off Wittenoom Road in Neridup. I overlooked this location on my trip out here a few weeks back, so Deb reminded me off this spot. My exploration will be restricted to the edge of the clearing as the bush is dripping wet from all the rain.

As I am in the Ford Falcon today, I park just in the southern entrance to the bitumen dump, as the bushes growing in the middle of the track are too large to drive over. I begin my search moving north along the western boundary. Underneath the bushes I find a single Dark Banded greenhood (Pterostylis sanguinea) and very close-by some snail orchids. The snail orchids appear to be Brittle snail orchids (Pterostylis timothyi) due to the small rosette of pointed veined leaves and the tinge of fawn in the green and white flower. These little guys flower July through September in a range from Lake Cronin to Esperance.

Some Hare orchids (Leporella fimbriata) are found next, however are way past their best, with obvious signs of being pollinated. Hoping for something better I move onwards, when I spy some Caladenia orchids in bud. Kneeling down to grab a photo, something white catches my eye. Less than 1 metre away are some Western wispy spider orchids (Caladenia microchila) in full bloom. So exciting to find some spider orchids in flower. These guys flower July through October over a wide range from Kondinin to Madura.

Continuing my search to the north of the blue metal hill, I come across a nice hood of snail orchids, then closer to the northern entrance a Banded greenhood (Pterostylis vittata) is found.

Moving out of the track onto the road verge, a donkey orchid in flower is finally found. Based on the location and colouring these must be Green Range donkey orchids (Diuris littoralis) which flower July to early September in a south coastal range from Denmark to Esperance.

Walking along the entire verge back to the southern entrance I come across further Donkey orchids, snail orchids and banded greenhoods. So after taking some further photos, which I will not post, I decide to move to another location.

Pulling into what I believe to be the old Neridup Tennis Courts, I sit up in the car and have a bite to eat and drink, whilst a rain shower passes. I then have a quick look around and only find more Caladenia orchids budding up. Nothing in flower found unfortunately.

So onwards I go via a few more possible locations before pulling into our new Coolinup road location. Walking down this so called track the first orchid found is another Brittle snail orchid. Then I find some more Hare orchids which are also past their prime. I then move into the scrub where I come across a nice hood of snail orchids.

Upon reaching the low granite outcrop the first finding was a Cyrtostylis orchid in bud growing at the base of a bush.

In the bushes off the granite to the north I find many Banded greenhoods before stumbling across some Caladenia in bud.

It is past 2.30 in the afternoon so I start making my way back to the Ford, when I stumble across more Banded greenhoods and Brittle snail orchids. However I am nearly back at the car when some other greenhoods are found. From their size and colouring they may be Mallee Banded Greenhoods (Pterostylis arbuscula) which flower June to early September in an mostly inland range from Northampton to Eyre. Distinguishing features are short stature and few flowered inflorescence.

I move on to the original Coolinup Road site of the small granite outcrop. Due to the lack of rain this season the puddle blocking access had not yet been filled, so access was much easier than this time last year. Whilst looking underneath the bushes for Mosquito orchids I was amazed to find some spider orchids, as I have never found them here before. They appear to be further Western wispy spider orchids, given the size of their labellum’s

Upon further searching I found more greenhoods and snail orchids. Bird orchids had started but were a long way from flowering, so were the mosquito orchid, plus the larger spider orchids were also a few weeks away from flowering. Grabbed a few snaps of the Pterostylis orchids then moved on.

Myrup Rd is my next destination for a quick search. Some very nice Banded greenhoods are found first followed by many emerging Caladenia orchids. Just a tad early to catch anything in flower though.

Another solo search has ended with a few orchids found. 7 species in fact

Esperance Excellence

Esperance, Helms Arboretum, Myrup

16/09/2018

After our eventful trip along the Holland Track going back to everyday life is hard. Today though we get to babysit our grandson Oliver (Ollie) whilst his parents have a photoshoot. 

Location for the photoshoot is Helms Arboretum, so we may as well kill 2 birds with 1 stone. Orchid hunting, then babysitting, then more orchid hunting. Sound like a plan.

The arboretum (Mud Map SE 35) will always produce the goods. The question is will it produce any surprises. 

Just through the gates, we take the first track to the left and immediately we spy orchids. We had to be careful getting out of the Triton as there we Zebra orchids (Caladenia cairnsiana) growing right near the wheel tracks. These little orchids are found from Esperance to Lancelin growing August to November.

Larger orchids from the Caladenia genus were found on both sides of the track. The large orchids are none other than the Esperance king spider orchid (Caladenia decora) which flowers August to October in a small range from Bremer Bay to Cape Arid. Colours range from mostly red to greenish yellow and everything in between.

The final find before moving on to our babysitting duties was the small yellow Common Bee orchid (Diuris decrementa) which is found September to October in a large range from Gingin to Israelite Bay.

For the next 2 hours we look after Ollie, so Jace and Amber can get some classic photos prior to the arrival of their daughter, who is due within weeks.

Photoshoot over, so we say our goodbyes to the little family and continue with our orchid hunt. However to ensure we increase our chances of finding something different we decide to move onto our Myrup location. 

First orchids found were more Esperance king spider orchids, with many  in clusters. Variable in colour again, but oh so impressive.

Also found was the wonderful Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) which flowers over a huge range from north of Geraldton to Israelite Bay. There is great variability in the shape of these orchids and the amount and type of red markings. 

Pushing into the tea tree thicket we stumbled across a duo of another Caladenia genus orchid. This time it is a Short-sepalled spider orchid (Caladenia brevisura) which is found between Borden and Israelite Bay during the months August to October.

Then to our surprise we find a little Purple enamel orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) nearby. These guys flower August to October as well, though over a much larger range. Kalbarri to Israelite Bay in fact.

Then the final new orchid for the day is found. Appears to be the Western wispy spider orchid (Caladenia microchila) which flowers August & September in an easterly range from Hyden to Israelite Bay.

Western wispy spider orchid

Western Wispy spider orchid

There are so many Esperance king spider orchids in flower. To enable this to be appreciated I took a short video looking around. 

Also took some more photos of other orchids found. Previously mentioned in this post so will just let you enjoy some more orchids.

Seven species located today so all in all it was a successful day hunting. The Esperance region certainly is Excellent.