07/09/2021 ….. Wellington National Park to Condinup Crossing

Collie SF, Condinup Reserve, National Parks, Numerous days, Other Reserves, Preston (Greater) NP, Road Trip, State Forest, Wellington NP, Western Australian Orchids, Wilga SF

Waking up in the middle of the bush is such an amazing way to start the day. After an enjoyable relaxing breakfast we venture into the bush for an explore. Close to our camp we stumble across some snail orchids. Possibly Red sepaled snail orchid (Pterostylis erubescens ) even though it is not recorded at this location in either the Atlas of Living Australia or Florabase. The uniformly thickened lateral sepals, pointed hood and red colouring though all allude to this identification. In the reference books, its location is listed as between Mandurah and Albany, which one would think includes Wellington National Park.

Further afield we find the colourful Little pink fairy (Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans) which is a common orchid found from Northampton to Esperance. The easiest way to distinguish them from the similar Pink Fairy is the colour to the reverse of their leaf. Little pink fairies are red whilst pink fairies are green.

Then we are very happy with our next find. The Bird orchid (Pterostylis barbata) is the most widespread of this complex, with it’s range occurring from Bindoon to Albany. The dorsal sepal and petals form a hood, whilst the lateral sepals are long and narrow. The featherlike labellum, appears to erupt from a burst belly.

Next up some more common pterostylis sp. orchids are found. The ever reliable Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva) and the Banded greenhood (Pterostylis vittata) are found, but only one specimen of each, which is unusual.

Then more snail orchids are found and upon closer inspection they have crinkled edged leaves on their rosette. They must be the Slender snail orchid (Pterostylis crispula) which is found in forests between Perth and Albany.

Another colour then catches our eye. We find a Silky blue orchid (Cyanicula sericea) partly open so grab a snap. However a bit later on we find some fully open. These beautiful orchids flower over most of the southwest, from Jurien Bay to Fitzgerald River National Park. They are also listed as being found east of Esperance, which is interesting. A population separated from the main location is referred to as a disjunct occurrence.

Well finally time to move on, so we leave our overnight campsite and venture back south towards Mungalup road. Rather than go back to the dam we turn at River Road and make a stop just past the Transmission Tower north of Pile Road. Here we locate some more Red-sepaled snail orchids, Jug orchids and Little pink fairies.

Turning onto Pile Road we travel east and flow into Mungalup road. Further along we then turn off into the Collie State Forest, onto a gravel track named Lyalls Log Road and head into the unknown. At a small creek crossing we stop to investigate. Here we find some snail orchids growing on the banks. Due to the uniformly thickened lateral sepals and the hairy stem, they must be more Red-sepaled snail orchids.

We then move away from the crossing to pull off the track in case anyone else comes along. We then continue our investigation of the nearby open bushland. Here we find more beautiful Silky blue orchids which stand out in the gravely ground.

Then a Bird orchid is found looking like it is giving praise to the heavens. Later on further blooming Bird orchids are found.

The usual suspects for today are found again. Banded greenhood, Little pink fairy and Jug orchid. Ok, I wonder if anything else will turn up. We widen our search with fingers crossed.

Our hopes are rewarded, with some Clubbed spider orchids (Caladenia longiclavata) found interspersed between the trees. This orchid flowers from September to early November and is distributed between Perth and Albany growing in forests and woodlands. It grow up to 400mm in height and has a single , erect hairy leaf which can be up to 180mm in length. Now the orchids could also be the Big clubbed spider orchid (c. magniclavata) as the clubbed sections of the lateral sepals seem to be half the length which is a distinguishing feature, whilst the previously mentioned Clubbed spider orchid has clubs around 1/3rd the length of the sepals. What do you think is the right ID?

Then we are amazed to find another type of spider orchid as well. The Leaping spider orchid (Caladenia macrostylis) flowers from August to early November over a range between Albany and Bindoon. The species name refers to the broad wings to the column. Another distinguishing feature is the dense central cluster of deep, purplish calli.

After nearly 40 mins searching this location we decide we had best move on. We did not get to far along the road before we pull over again. Another new orchid for today is found. The small Midge orchid (Cyrtostylis huegelii) needs a steady hand to get a good shot. Unfortunately no steady hand between us 😦 , however will post the best pic. These little guys flower July to September so we are lucky to find some still in flower.

What caught our eye and made us stop at this spot was the large flock of Bird orchids. Also mixed in was a lone Little pink fairy. Photos taken we move on, but don’t get very far, coz a double headed Little pink fairy catches our eye.

Our road eventually terminates at a T junction with Mungalup Tower road and we head south. This road terminates at a tree plantation, so we skirt along the boundary of this plantation until we reach Lyalls Mill Road. So we end up stopping multiple times along the way as orchids catch our eye. A random selection of photos taken is posted for your enjoyment, as no new species were found.

Being close to Glen Mervyn Dam we decide to pull into the picnic area for our lunch. (Refer feature picture) Whilst enjoying lunch overlooking the beautiful water, we discover a nice little grouping of Little pink fairies and another jug orchid. However we do not venture far as we still have a ways to go before our planned overnight stay at Debbie’s cousin Kerry’ farm.

Still around 80-100kms to travel, however we only make it to Noggerup before stopping again. We take a road into the Preston National Park (Shown as Greater Preston NP in Maps) where we go for an exploration. We find orchids, however no new species which is disappointing, but hey, orchids are orchids, so of course we take many photos.

We head back to the Donnybrook Boyup Brook road and move south to Camballan Road, where we stop for another search, this time in the Wilga State Forest. At last we find a new species for the day. The quirky Dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) is found standing proud. It is quite unique in appearance, given the petals and lateral sepals are held horizontally. Another new species for the day is the Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) which is usually found everywhere, but we only find one lone specimen here. Other orchids found were the Little pink fairy and Jug orchid.

A little further along the road we make one final stop in the Wilga State Forest, as farmland is looming. Only found a Banded greenhood in our quick search though. So we moved on and pulled over on the verge of Condinup road for a slightly longer search (15 mins). Here we found some Little pink fairies, Cowslip and Jug orchids.

We were amazed by the large numbers of donkey orchids found here. There are 3 listed in Florabase as occurring in the Boyup Brook shire but only 1 of these is listed in Atlas of Living Australia. That one being the Purple pansy orchid , which they are definitely not, so I will just refer to them as Donkey orchids (Diuris sp.). As per usual, please comment if you can help identify the species.

Getting close to our destination, so we move on and go over Condinup Crossing, where we pull up at a previously known location. Deb heads off straight away looking for the white spider orchids, whilst I do my usual wander. She did find a couple of them and from the location I feel they could be the White spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. longicauda) which is recorded as growing in woodlands from Lancelin to Mount Barker.

No other new orchids for the day are found however I will post some pics to confirm the location they were found. The donkey orchids though look like the Small flowered donkey orchid (Diuris porrifolia) which is listed as being found around these parts. Thoughts?

Well it’s now after 4pm so we jump back in the Triton and head to Kerry’s farm, where we are staying the night.

Not too bad a day today. Travelled new routes and found many orchids. 14 species in fact, so an awesome day actually.

27/08/2020 ….. Dinninup to Nunijup Lake (Road Trip 2020)

Condinup Reserve, Nature Reserves, Other Reserves, Road Trip, Scotts Brook NR, Six Mile Road NR, Tone Perup NR, Western Australian Orchids

After an amazing sleep we enjoy breakfast with Kerry and her family before we are taken on a drive to the farm cemetery, which may actually be located in Condinup Reserve. In the bush surrounding the cemetery we find some orchids.

Family farm cemetery

Small flowered donkey orchid

(Diuris porrifolia)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Thanking Kerry for her hospitality we head south to Dinninup and make our first stop at the intersection of Six Mile and Harrison roads.

Six Mile and Harrison Rds

Donkey orchid

(Diuris sp.)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Silky blue orchid

(Cyanicula sericea)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Next up we pullover at Six Mile Road Nature Reserve for a quick look.

Purple pansy orchid

(Diuris longifolia)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Slender snail orchid

(Pterostylis crispula)

Banded greenhood

(Pterostylis vittata)

Cowslip orchid

(Caladenia flava subsp. flava)

Silky blue orchid

(Cyanicula sericea)

Diuris sp.

It is now past noon so we had better move on. We head south through Mayanup and take Scotts Brook Road toward the Tone Perup Nature Reserve. Pulling up on the roadside, we were surprised and elated as we got to see a real life Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) sitting on a log. After calming down we ventured into the woodland to search for orchids.

Tone Perup Nature Reserve

Common donkey orchid or Small flowered donkey orchid

(Diuris corymbosa or D. porrifolia)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Common spider orchid

(Caladenia varians)

Tenterden yellow spider orchid, Straw-coloured spider orchid

(Caladenia straminichila)

Lake Muir spider orchid, Red-veined spider orchid

(Caladenia validinervia)

Joseph’s spider orchid

(Caladenia polychroma)

Silky blue orchid

(Cyanicula sericea)

Just after 1.30pm we move on. However, only minutes down the road we come to Scotts Brook Nature Reserve. As it appears to have seen a bushfire recently, we pull over for a quick scout around.

Joseph’s spider orchid

(Caladenia polychroma)

Purple pansy orchid

(Diuris longifilia)

Common spider orchid

(Caladenia varians)

Primrose spider orchid

(Caladenia xantha)

??? spider orchid

(Caladenia sp.)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp.reptans)

Silky blue orchid

(Cyanicula sericea)

It’s been nearly 1 hr since we pulled up to Scotts Brook N.R. so we had better get a move on. We didn’t get far before a change in habitat had us pull into a side road for a scout around.

Chowerup – Scotts Brook Road verge

Slender snail orchid

(Pterostylis crispula)

Silky blue orchid

(Cyanicula sericea)

??? donkey/pansy orchid

(Diuris sp.)

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Time flies when you’re having fun. Nearly 3 pm, so we head onward looking for an overnight camping site. We discover a wonderful abandoned cemetery, so we had to pull over to explore.

Lichen covered sign

Little pink fairies

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Western wheatbelt donkey orchid

(Diuris brachyscapa)

Nice little stop with a couple of orchids growing between the gravesites. Onwards we go, further south-east, checking out nature reserves for places to camp. Nothing found, so we finally pull up to our backup overnight stay.

Nunijup Lake

Small flowered donkey orchid

(Diuris porrifolia)

Tenterden yellow spider orchid

(Caladenia straminichila)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Tangled white spider orchid

(Caladenia longicauda subsp. redacta)

Well, we can finally rest up and enjoy the campfire. A wonderful day on the road with many orchids found. Some new locations explored and a favourite overnight spot revisited. At least 15 species found, which is amazing. Roll on tomorrow!!!

21/08/2020 ….. Pingeculling Nature Reserve to Montague State Forest (Road Trip 2020)

Goodenough NR, Horne NR, Hotham River NR, Montague SF, Nature Reserves, Pingeculling NR, Road Trip, State Forest, Western Australian Orchids

We pack up camp after breakfast and head back the way we came yesterday, as we don’t wish to encounter any more trees across the track by heading further west. Deb grabs some orchid photos on the way out and we inspect a farmers rubbish pile for any collectables.

Cowslip orchid

(Caladenia flava subsp.flava)

Common donkey orchid

(Diuris corymbosa)

As we didn’t find much in the rubbish dump we jump back in the Triton and head back to Moorumbine Road then turn south. Along this road we find our next stop, the Horne Nature Reserve. Weirdly the only access to the reserve is a sealed road which leads to a Telstra tower. So we park up at the tower and go exploring. We find some orchids, however more excitedly, we come across an Echidna.

Sugar orchid

(Ericksonella saccharata)

Frog greenhood

(Pterostylis sargentii)

Western wheatbelt donkey orchid

(Diuris brachyscapa)

Little pink fairy, dwarf pink fairy

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Echidna playing hide n seek with us

It’s now after 11.30 in the morning, so we make tracks toward Pingelly. On the Aldersyde Pingelly Road we pull over on the side of the road, at the strangely named Goodenough Nature Reserve. We explore for orchids and are not disappointed.

Goodenough Nature Reserve

Green spider orchid, Fringed mantis orchid

(Caladenia falcata)

Blue beard, blue fairy orchid

(Pheladenia deformis)

Small flowered donkey orchid

(Diuris porrifolia)

Cowslip orchid

(Caladenia flava subsp. flava)

Red-veined shell orchid

(Pterostylis hamiltonii)

Banded greenhood

(Pterostylis vittata)

Feeling a bit peckish, we decide to head off and check out Pingelly for lunch. Whilst waiting for our counter meal, Deb relives our time at Las Vegas.

After enjoying an amazing lunch, we head south down the Great Southern Hwy. We only just leave the townsite when we pull over to check out some promising woodland. This proved to be a great decision.

Just South of Pingelly

Crimson spider orchid

(Caladenia footeana)

Blue beard

(Pheladenia deformis)

Green spider orchid

(Caladenia falcata)

Small flowered donkey orchid

(Diuris porrifolia)

Banded greenhood

(Pterostylis vittata)

Was very happy to have found a red coloured spider orchid, however we must move on. Our next stop is along Langes Road in the Hotham River Nature Reserve. We go exploring this wonderful woodland (Featured Image) and find a few orchids, which is a bonus.

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Sugar orchid

(Ericksonella saccharata)