10/9/2021 ….. Stirling Range National Park to Chirelillup Nature Reserve

Camel Lake NR, Chirelillup NR, National Parks, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Road Trip, Stirling Range NP, Western Australian Orchids

Well after enjoying our 2nd night at the Stirling Range Retreat, we pack up and head out on our exploration of the Stirling Range National Park. We plan on taking the Stirling Range Drive to Red Gum Pass Road, then north to Salt River Road. Then heading east to Formby Road South where we will head north to Gnowangerup. Obviously we plan on making numerous stops to explore for orchids and to enjoy the wonderful outdoors.

First up we head into Bluff Knoll Road to check out the orchids in one further location. Maybe we will find something different without the threat of rain hanging over our heads. Not surprisingly, the orchids found were the same as the ones found yesterday, but photos were taken again of course.

Nearly 10am, so we make tracks toward our next location. On Stirling Range Drive, we make a split second decision to pull over on the side of the road. We manage to find a few orchids on the side of the road.

We jump back in the Triton and move a few hundred metres down the road before stopping at a spot that had seen a bushfire some time in the last year. Let us see if this has triggered orchids to grow for us to find.

Now it nearly 11am so onwards we travel, with our next stop being Talyuberlup Picnic Area. First up we check the picnic area side of the road then we head up the Talyuberlup Peak trail a wee bit, before scrambling back to the triton. As we had hoped, orchids are found.

Time to consider lunch, so we move onwards to White Gum Flat picnic area. We have a bite to eat and then go exploring the nearby area. We don’t venture to far before we find orchids. This time round we actually cross the road and find further orchids including new ones for the day. Turns out the King spider orchid is a new species for us, so that was an exciting find.

Still more of this National Park to check out so onwards we go. At the intersection of Red Gum Pass Road we turn left and check out some locations along the roadside. We found a few orchids including some new ones for the day.

We now head north along Red Gum Pass Road and make a quick stop into the picnic area, where we find a few orchids but move further north to another road side location where orchids are located as well.

We eventually reach Salt River Road and turn right. However we soon pull over at Salt Lake Nature Reserve for an explore, but after a quick check not much is located so we move on to Camel Lake Nature Reserve, with a road side stop along the way. At this final stop we are lucky to find some new orchid species for the day as well as previously found ones. Photos of all those found at the locations along the way were taken to record their discovery near the northern boundary of the National Park.

Wowsers, they were amazing first time locations for orchids. 13 possible species and 1 hybrid found, however we must move on as it’s past 4.30pm and we still have nearly 50kms to our planned destination. We arrive at Chirelillup Nature Reserve, set up camp and whilst Deb lights the campfire I have a very quick scout around in the waning sunlight.

09/09/2021 ….. Stirling Range National Park and surrounds

Formby NR, Mabinup Creek NR, National Parks, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Road Trip, Stirling Range NP, Western Australian Orchids

We awake to a cold , wet and miserable day, but we won’t let that stop us from going exploring for orchids. Finally the rain stops, so after a bite of lunch, we head up to the Bluff Knoll lookout however the actual mountain is nearly covered in clouds. The feature picture show some of the amazing metal artwork installed there. Some close-up images are included here for your appreciation.

Bluff Knoll hidden in cloud

So now is the time to commence our exploration of the area. We have a very quick scout around the lookout and parking area, where we see a few orchids. However on the drive into the lookout we saw some possible spots to check out along the roadside. So it is at these couple of stops, in between showers, that we locate the following orchids.

It’s now past 2.30pm so we only have a few hours of daylight left to explore, so we will keep close to our base. Therefore we make tracks north of the National Park, to visit the nearby Formby Nature Reserve, which weirdly is still signposted as the Mabinup Creek Nature Reserve. The northern boundary of the park is found to be very weedy and the creek is overflowing, which does not thrill us too much. So we head back down Formby Road South and venture in on the eastern boundary. Next time we need to pack wellington boots as the place is flooded, but we venture in nonetheless, after applying insect repellent, as the mozzies may become troublesome. This place proves to be covered in orchids in large numbers and many species, which is amazing to us. Refer the following images of the orchids found.

I just had to pop in some photos to show how many orchids were at this location as well as the ones we found swimming.

It is now after 4.30 so we head back toward our base at the Stirling Range Retreat, but as per usual we make one more stop. We pull off the road before the Mount Trio turn-off and head down this gravel track. This is a new location for us in the park and it proves to be quite fruitful. Our quick stop though runs into another hour. Luckily the rain holds off. Here is what we found.

With the light running out fast we do a u-turn, head back to Formsby Road South and make tracks for our little cabin. What an amazing afternoon of orchid hunting we have had today, especially given the cold and wet morning we awoke to. I think we found 23 species and at least 3 hybrids which is mind blowing but this National Park and it’s surrounding are like an oasis in the middle of cleared land for agriculture.

20/06/2021 ….. Munglinup weekend .. Day 2

Cascade NR, Fields NR, Munglinup NR, Nature Reserves, Road Trip, Speddingup NR, Springdale NR, Weekend away, Western Australian Orchids

Waking to another beautiful morning at Munglinup Beach Camping Ground we enjoy a leisurely morning before packing up the camper and moving to Springdale Nature Reserve for our first orchid hunt. No orchids found so we move onto Munglinup Nature Reserve to see if we have better luck.

We park up just inside the track and venture in on foot. First orchid for the day is the Dark banded greenhood (Pterostylis sanguinea) which is a widespread orchid flowering June to September.

Once we reach the old gravel pit Deb heads off to the area she had previously found Hare orchid (Leporella fimbriata) leaves. She was lucky to find some in flower even though they are way past their best.

Also found a very promising leaf about 4mm across. It appears to be from the Drakaea genus however the only species mentioned as being located near this location has a smooth heart shaped leaf. This leaf has small hairs over it’s surface so may be another species not listed for this location. Again any assistance you can provide to the correct identification would be appreciated.

Nothing more found at this location so we move onto one of our regular haunts along the highway. At the intersection of Mills Road we go exploring, though not expecting too much to be found. However we find our first orchid from the Diuris genus, which is exciting. The Green Range donkey orchid (Diuris littoralis) is found in large numbers, however there are only a few early flowering ones, given that they are said to flower from July to September.

Also found some dark greenhood orchids and well as some lighter green in colour. They may be two species or colour variant’s of the same. Possible identification: Dark banded greenhood (Pterostylis sanguinea), Mallee banded greenhood (Pterostylis arbuscula) or Banded greenhood (Pterostylis vittata). Give me your thoughts.

We next move along Mills Road to our next location (Mud Map SE32). We first explore the north side of the road and come across a Hairy-stemmed snail orchid (Pterostylis setulosa) flowering all alone. Another solo specimen is later found. Crossing to the south side of the road proves fruitless so we move on.

We head further north, as we have chosen to check out Cascade Nature Reserve. Here we pull into the old quarry/gravel pit and go exploring. First up we find more banded greenhoods, then discover a shell orchid in bud. It should be a Dwarf shell orchid (Pterostylis brevichila), which flower from July to September, as it is just starting to flower. All other inland shell orchid species commence flowering in May.

If we get a chance we will return later to catch the shell orchids in full flower. However we must keep moving, so even further north we check out Fields Nature Reserve. This is a new location so very unsure what may be here. Unfortunately we only find more greenhood orchids. These appear to be a mixture of species, which is cool.

The only other species found was a single, early flowering, Brittle snail orchid (Pterostylis timothyi) which have a small rosette of pointed leaves and the flower is green and fawn in colour. They are said to flower from July, hence this one is not fully formed as yet.

We now head east and at the Scaddan / Dalyup boundary, we check out Speddingup Nature Reserve. We had visited here back on the 22/5/21, when we located many pterostylis rosettes, so we hope some have now flowered.

Well first up we found what appeared to be a Midget greenhood (Pterostylis mutica) in bud. Then as expected we finally find some Dwarf shell orchids (Pterostylis brevichila) in flower. In fact they were even growing on the edge of the track. These are an inland shell orchid which flowers from July, so we are lucky some early flowering specimens were here.

I venture across the road and find more banded greenhoods. Again the species may be variable.

It is now 4pm so time to make tracks for home. A great day with some good finds. The season is starting out great. I can’t wait till the next adventure.

08/08/2020 ….. Esperance to Corrigin (Road Trip 2020)

Nature Reserves, Overshot Hill NR, Pallarup NR, Road Trip, Springdale NR, Western Australian Orchids

Leaving Esperance at just after 7am we are finally on our way. This year I will be listing the orchids found at each stop on our journey. I will group the photos of a particular orchid together rather than post them in chronological order. If needed a little narrative about the trip may be added to a location based on anything that occurred on the way to it, during the visit itself or is planned after. Please provide me any feedback on this structure as I am open to suggestions how I can improve the blog or spice it up a bit… Thanks!!

Springdale Nature Reserve

This Nature Reserve was burnt out last summer and has proven this season to be successful in providing excellent orchid finds. Today is no exception.

Pink bunny orchid (Eriochilus scaber subsp. scaber)

Green Range donkey orchid

(Diuris littoralis)

Blue beard , Blue fairy orchid

(Pheladenia deformis)

Little pink fairy, Dwarf pink fairy

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Reaching spider orchid

(Caladenia arrecta)

Mills Road verge

Turning into Mills road off the South Coast Hwy, west of Munglinup, we stop at one of our regular road verge stops. To our dismay the area had been graded so the usual orchid habitat was destroyed. Luckily some orchids seem to like disturbed ground, whilst other areas had missed the destruction.

Cream spider orchid

(Caladenia horistes)

Green Range donkey orchid

(Diuris littoralis)

Mallee banded greenhood

(Pterostylis arbuscula)



Overshot Hill Nature Reserve

Parking at the free overnight camping area we venture into the creekline to look for the orchids we had found here previously. Again we were not disappointed. Of particular interest were the dual flowered and green coloured Dwarf shell orchids.

Dwarf shell orchid

(Pterostylis brevichila)

Midget greenhood

(Pterostylis mutica)



Pallarup Nature Reserve

Another of our favourite spots, which always seems to have some orchids in flower.

Hairy-stemmed snail orchid

(Pterostylis setulosa

Blue beard

(Pheladenia deformis)

Pink candy orchid

(Caladenia hirta subsp. rosea)

Sugar orchid

(Ericksonella saccharata)

Jug orchid, Bull orchid, Antelope orchid, Recurved shell orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Western wheatbelt donkey orchid

(Diuris brachyscapa)

Mallee banded greenhood

(Pterostylis arbuscula)



Varley

This is only our 2nd visit to this location and I’m glad we made the effort. So many spider orchids with some others thrown in for good measure.

Sugar orchid

(Ericksonela saccharata)

Midget greenhood

(Pterostylis mutica)

Blue beard

(Pheladenia deformis)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Hairy-stemmed snail orchids

(Pterostylis setulosa)

Western wispy spider orchid, Small-lipped spider orchid

(Caladenia microchila)

Chameleon spider orchid

(Caladenia dimidia)

Joseph’s spider orchid

(Caladenia polychroma)



Gorge Rock Picnic Area

Leaving Varley just after 3.15pm we make tracks for Gorge Rock, 14 kms east of Corrigin, for our overnight stay. Soup and toast for dinner then a well earned rest.


17 different orchid species found today, not too shabby.

19/07/2020 ….. Cascade Calling

Cascade NR, Day Trip, Western Australian Orchids

My sister, Lorraine and her hubby Ken are visiting us for a few days, so today we head out west to Cascade Falls. We are joined by our son Jace and his little family. The water is flowing nicely now it’s mid winter. The grandkids enjoy playing with all the foam caused by the water cascading over the granite rocks. After exploring the shore we set up on a flat area for a picnic lunch.

The little family head home whilst us oldies head off further west on an orchid hunt. This is a first for Lorraine and Ken, so let’s hope we have a successful hunt. We visit Cascade Nature Reserve and go for a check in the scrub/woodlands. With luck I come across some Dwarf shell orchids (Pterostylis brevichila), which we had found here previously. Not as many but still very happy to find them again. Dwarf shell orchids flower during the months of July, August and September over inland areas between Hyden and Mt Ragged.

As the image above shows we also find the Midget greenhood (Pterostylis mutica) which flowers from July till October over a much larger range, Wongan Hills to the South Australian Border. If fact they are also found in all the states of Australia. Another larger specimen was found further into our hunt.

Not much else turning up so we decide to head back to the Triton and stumble across one nice Banded greenhood (Pterostylis vittata) growing on the edge of the utilities track we are following.

Leaving Cascade Nature Reserve we head back east and stop along Boydell Road. In the road side scrub we locate some donkey orchids. They appear to be the Green Range donkey orchid (Diuris littoralis) which occurs in coastal and near coastal locations between Denmark and Esperance. They flower from July to early September and were only formally named in 2016 from specimens collected in 1995.

Not much else found so we head across the Coolgardie – Esperance Hwy and head into Neridup. Here we visit our favourite blue metal dump site and as we arrive I jump out to walk along the track in to see what I can find. The others drive in ,park up and get out stuff for afternoon tea. I discover some Brittle snail orchids (Pterostylis timothyi) growing in the gravelly mounds pushed up to create the blue metal dump. These awesome little orchids flower from July to September over an eastern range of Lake Cronin to Esperance. The prominently veined , pointed leaves of the rosette is a distinctive feature of these orchids.

Also on the edge of the cleared area in a slight depression, the spider orchids we found last year were again located. The Western wispy spider orchid (Caladenia microchila) flowers from July to early October and has an eastern distribution from Kondinin to Madura.

After enjoying afternoon tea we spread out and immediately find some more donkey orchids. They appear to be more Green Range donkey orchids, as the only similarly coloured donkey orchid found this far east is the Yellow granite donkey orchid. However we are not near any granite.

We now cross over Wittenoom Road and come across some Green-veined shell orchids (Pterostylis scabra) near a small, currently dry, road run-off trench. These orchids flower from May to August over a large mostly inland area from Kalbarri to Esperance. Unlike the Dwarf shell orchid found at Cascade this shell orchid has it’s labellum visible. A little like poking out their tongues.

Getting late in the afternoon and the sun sets early in winter, so we start to make our way back to the Trition. Along the way we find another colourful Donkey orchid, some more Brittle snail orchids and a small speck of blue. Blue beards (Pheladenia deformis) in bud but not yet open are found. So as the season moves on, so must we as we have a date around the fire pit at home will all our travelling companions from today.

A great family picnic followed by a successful orchid hunt. Not too bad for a Sunday in mid winter.

A time when the Pterostylis ruled the Woodlands

Day Trip, Helms Arboretum, Nature Reserves, Red Lake Townsite NR, Truslove North NR, Truslove Townsite NR

13/07/2019

Finally after what seems like ages, we head off on a drive to search for some orchids. First stop is the wonderful Helms Arboretum, (Mud Map SE35 ) at the snail orchid plot. Well in previous years it was the snail orchid plot, however we may be a little early this year.

Eventually we come across some rosettes and then a few are in flower. Appears to be the species found 30/07 last year which could not be named. Western Australian Native Orchids Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/517329235050125/ identified these as an unnamed snail orchid from the South East.

Also found the leaves oF the spider orchids from previous years , so will be coming back later in the season to check on them. Moving along the track we find some Banded greenhoods (Pterostylis vittata) and Dark banded greenhoods (Pterostylis sanguinea) growing on the verge. The lateral sepals are fleshier in the Dark banded greenhood, as the below pictures illustrate. 

More of the same found so we decide to proceed to our next planned stop – Fleming Grove Road. Here we find lots of Hare orchids (Leporella fimbriata) in the final stages of flowering.

Pushing through the scrub we stubble across more Banded greenhoods growing under bushes for protection from being eaten by  the kangaroos.

Then nearby  we are lucky enough to find a solitary donkey orchid barely in flower. Based on location this must be a Green Range donkey orchid (Diuris littoralis) which flowers July to early September over a near coastal range from  Denmark to Esperance. Then another more open flower is found closer to the greenhoods.

Moving on again this time to Truslove Townsite Nature Reserve which unfortunately turns up orchidless. However Truslove North Nature Reserve turns up some Dark banded greenhoods.

Next stop is Red Lake Townsite Nature Reserve where we take a break for lunch. Deb finishes her lunch first and heads off up the track by foot on her search. I have a quick look around , finding more Dark banded greenhoods, and then jump in the Triton to move up to Deb as she has found something new. Dwarf shell orchids (Pterostylis brevichila) are her find, which flower July to September in a range from Hyden to Mt Ragged. Great pickup Deb!!

 Next up Deb finds a Midget greenhood (Pterostylis mutica) so close to flowering. These little guys are found July to October from Wongan Hills to the SA border.  Also within coo wee are some yet to fully open Frog greenhoods (Pterostylis sargentii) which flower July to October in an inland range from Northampton to Grass Patch. Better specimens are found down another track.

Then some more greenhoods are found, so last minute photos taken before moving on.

Our final destination for today is Eldred Rd near Salmon Gums, where we check out the woodlands surrounding a clay pan lake. (see Feature Image). Only orchids found were more greenhoods, but some appear to be the newly named Mallee banded greenhood (Pterostylis arbuscula) which flowers June to September in an inland range from Northampton to Eyre. All orchids  were restricted to the bases of the larger trees.

Mallee banded greenhoods
Short stature and few flowered inflorescence.

So today was a day that the Pterostylis orchids ruled. At least 7 species found.  

?? Snail

Dwarf Shell

Banded Greenhoods x 3

Midget Greenhood

Frog Greenhood

The Diuris and Leporella are bonus orchids in a woodland of Pterostylis.

2018 Road Trip – Holland Track and Beyond – Day 5

Numerous days, Road Trip

28/08/2018

Another beautiful morning, so what better way to start than to go orchid hunting. We all make tracks for Emu Rock as it was too dark yesterday to check it thoroughly. First find for me was a rare double-headed Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata) whilst Deb was checking out the small Hairy-stemmed snail orchids (Pterostylis sp. ‘inland’) I had found yesterday. 

Close by I found another Chameleon spider orchid (Caladenia dimidia) whilst Deb found a Blue beard (Pheladenia defromis).  

Whilst taking Deb and Richard back to the Chameleon spider orchids I found yesterday other orchids were found. Mallee Banded Greenhood (Pterostylis arbuscula), Hairy-stemmed snail orchids and  Sugar orchids.

Further shots taken of the Chameleon spiders then on the way back to the Tritons, I found another double header Sugar orchid. 

Time to continue our trek along the Holland Track. We make our way north back to the Hyden – Norseman Road where we start the official Holland Track to Coolgardie. What lies ahead is unknown !!!!!

The start of the track

Hyden – Norseman Road – Our Starting point of the Track proper

 Following the trip notes our first stop will be Sheoak Rock just off the track at the 12.53km mark. However after around 10kms we pull over as Deb has spied a Frog greenhood (Pterostylis sargentii). Whilst I was taking photos she also finds a Sugar orchid  nearby.  

We move on to Sheoak rock which is a few hundred metres North of the track proper. It was wet and muddy however we park up an go for a wander. On the high point of the rock was a Trig Station (Triangulation/Trigonometrical) made of metal which is nice piece of history. Whilst getting some photos it started to rain so we made our way back to the Tritons for shelter. Making our way out of Sheoak Rock I cross through a patch of bush and come across some Sugar orchids. 

Back on the track we pass a Telecom Tower (reception still) at the 15.25km point and reach Native Rocks at the 15.69km point where we park up for lunch. Whilst Deb and Richard put the kettle on and rustle up some grub I go for a scout. First off is another Sugar orchid but then I stumble across a very tall Frog greenhood growing out in the open on granite.

After a quick bite to eat I check the other side of the track where I find spider orchids yet to open.. Oh bugger we may be too early !!!! 

However luck is on my side and I find some flowering.. Now the hard part getting a good photo then working out which species. From the looks they are possible Pendant spider orchids (Caladenia pendens subsp, pendens) due the size of the labellum and length of petals and sepals.

Leaving Native Rocks we follow the trip notes for another 6.33km to our next stop of Wattle Rocks. We did get more puddles to cross on the way.

Another muddy puddle to cross

Here we go again and again and again…….. So many bog holes

Parking up at Wattle Rocks Deb immediately spots some orchids. Some very small Dwarf zebra orchids (Caladenia pachychila) are on the edge of the track, in danger of getting run over or trampled. these little beauties flower July to September in a large inland range from Nerren Nerren Station and Mt Ragged. 

Then a few metres away there was the biggest clumping of Ant orchid (Caladenia roei) I have ever seen.  They were an amazing sight.

Further afield we find what appears to be a Hybrid. Possible parents are Caladenia roei , Caladenia pachychila, Caladenia dimidia or Caladenia vulgata. An attractive small spider orchid.

Another new orchid found, this time it appears to be a Drooping spider orchid (Caladenia radialis) which must be getting very close to it’s eastern extremity. 

Other orchids found included Blue beard, Sugar orchid, Dwarf zebra orchid and the Western wispy spider orchid (Caladenia microchila) which is found between Kondinin and Madura during the months of July to early October. 

What a great spot little spot this is, but we must move on. Next stop is 1.86km further along, at a Mallee fowl nest which appears to be in current use.  

Mallee fowl nest

Large nesting mound

We had planned on getting to Mount Holland to camp but at our current travelling speed it will be dark before we get there, so we decide to look for a suitable camping spot along the way. We find a place just past a big slippery mud hole and set up camp. We light the obligatory camp fire and cook some dinner. 

Camp ground before the storm

Getting ready to cook dinner

Luckily we chose to camp earlier as a massive thunderstorm hits and we rename our camping ground “The mud camp”, as the track is now a much muddier, wetter and more slippery than it was. Tomorrow will be interesting going.

Was a successful orchid hunting day (12 species), but not so successful in travelling the distance we had planned. Achieved less than 30kms today as the Holland Track is proving more challenging than anticipated.

2018 Road Trip – Holland Track and Beyond – Day 2

Western Australian Orchids

25/08/2018

The previous afternoon in the fading light we checked out the area around the camper where we found little but rubbish. Deb and I split up for the walk back to the camper and I was lucky enough to stumble across a shell orchid in a runoff. No camera or phone so returned this morning to grab a snap. They appear to be the Dwarf shell orchid (Pterostylis brevichila) as they do not have a protruding labellum.  They flower July through September in a range between Hyden and Mt Ragged. Found a few more so grabbed some pics before heading off to Broomehill, where we are meeting up with Richard.

We make our way back to the South Coast Hwy and head west to Kukenarup memorial, another favourite haunt. Straight up we find a Dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) which flower August to early October in a range from Israelite Bay to Kalbarri.   

Many more donkey orchids were found which appear to be the South coast donkey orchid (Diuris sp. ‘south coast’) due to the recurved lateral sepals. The Green range donkey orchid occupies the same range however is recorded as having reflexed lateral sepals.  Also located was a great specimen of the Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva) which flower August to October from Geraldton to Israelite Bay. 

Time to move on, so we make tracks for Jerramungup, where we stop for toilets and also purchased some forgotten items. Next stop is just past Ongerup, in Jaekel St,  where we find more donkey orchids. This time though they appear to be Green Range donkey orchids (Diuris littoralis) which flower July to September from Denmark to Esperance. Nearby though are some pale yellow donkey orchids which could be Western wheatbelt donkey orchids (Diuris brachyscapa) which flower July to September in a range bordered by York, Tenterden and Ravensthorpe. Then back on the Gnowangerup-Jerramungup Road  we find the Green range donkey orchid in large numbers.  

Also located in these areas were a few scattered Sugar orchids (Ericksonella saccharata), which are found over a huge range from Paynes Find to Israelite Bay, flowering during August and September.  Plus a nice bright yellow Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava), which flowers July to early December in a range from Geraldton to Israelite Bay.

Arriving in Broomehill half an hour late, we find Richard and his matching Red Triton and camper parked outside the hotel. We make our way on foot to the Henry Jones Winery & Café for a coffee and one of the best BLT in Turkish bread ever. A leisurely walk back to the Tritons through the village of Broomehill, then we head out to an old historic bridge for a look. At the Wadjekanup Bridge we put the Tritons through a river crossing which they pass with flying colours. If only the water was this clear on the Holland Track !!!!. 

Now the adventure really begins. We head north out of Broomehill, before turning right over the railway line and onto a single lane track. Welcome to the “Holland Track”. Looks great so far, as we drive down between green farming fields, before turning west into a patch of bush. Here we chose to camp the night, at a nice early time of 4.15pm. After making camp, I decide to check out the location for any orchids. Deb and Richard are collecting wood and lighting our camp fire, when I stumble across some large bright Cowslip orchids and a large hood of Hairy-stemmed snail orchids (Pterostylis sp. ‘inland’) 

Debbie and Richard now join the hunt. Many more Cowslips and Snail orchids were found. Debbie also finds some great Blue beards (Pheladenia deformis) which flower late May to October between Murchison River and Israelite Bay in WA, plus they are also found in NSW, VIC, TAS and SA. 

Getting late and with fading light we head back to the camp fire for a relaxing night after such a great day finding 10 orchid species.

Sunday search of Helms Arboretum

Western Australian Orchids

27/08/2017

Sunday morning fishing planned, however after a sleep-in we decide to head out to Helm’s Arboretum to check on the orchids instead. Our Southern Curly Locks is still yet to bloom so we resign ourselves to the fact we will miss it this season as we head out on our 3 week road trip in 3 days.

Next we check out the location we find our Western tiny blue orchids (Cyanicula aperta) and we were rewarded with both regular blue and some rarer white flowers.

In the adjoining plot I came across a first for me. A Grass-leafed spider orchid (Caladenia graminifolia) which flowers August to September and ranges from Mt Manypeaks to Israelite Bay. I thought is was a Green spider orchid however on checking my Orchid books it proved to be a Hoffman spider orchid due to the prominently clubbed sepals and petals plus the long thin fringe segments on the labellum.

Also in the same plot we located some Snail orchids and King spider orchids. I will go out on a limb and name the snail orchid as Ravensthorpe snail orchid (Pterostylis sp. ‘Ravensthorpe’) as they are found between Stirling Ranges and Esperance and flower August to September. The spider orchid is our local Esperance king spider orchid (Caladenia decora).