26/09/2021 ….. Hunting @ Helms

Day Trip, Esperance, Helms Arboretum, Western Australian Orchids

Well, after yesterday spending some time looking for orchids near our coastal lakes, it was inevitable that we would venture out to Helm’s Arboretum (Helm’s Forestry Reserve) to check out what is still flowering in this amazing location. (Mud Map SE35)

We do not have to venture far before we stumble across some orchid beauty. In the section near the entrance, we find the following orchids:

Common bee orchid (Diuris decrementa)

Common bee orchid (Diuris decrementa)

Common bee orchid (Diuris decrementa)
Esperance king spider orchid (Caladenia decora)

Esperance king spider orchid (Caladenia decora)

Esperance king spider orchid (Caladenia decora)
Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava)

Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp.flava)

Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava)
Common mignonette orchid (Microtis media)

Common mignonette orchid (Microtis media)

Common mignonette orchid (Microtis media)
Shy sun orchid (Thelymitra graminea)

Shy sun orchid (Thelymitra graminea)

Shy sun orchid (Thelymitra graminea)

Time is a moving and so must we, so onwards into the Arboretum we go. At the first road to the right, we turn off and slowly drive along looking out the windows. As soon as we spy something new, we pull over for a closer inspection. Along this track we find the following different orchids:

Little pink fairies (caladenia reptans subsp. reptans

Little pink fairies (Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Little pink fairies (caladenia reptans subsp. reptans
Un-named hybrid orchid (Caladenia flava x C. reptans)

Un-named Hybrid orchid (Caladenia flava x C. reptans)

Un-named hybrid orchid (Caladenia flava x C. reptans)
Pink fairies (caladenia latifolia)

Pink fairies (Caladenia latifolia)

Pink fairies (caladenia latifolia)
Lemon-scented sun orchid (Thelymitra antennifera)

Lemon-scented sun orchid (Thelymitra antennifera)

Lemon-scented sun orchid (Thelymitra antennifera)

Moving further into the Arboretum we stop at a specific spot to find the Rattle beaks and we are not disappointed. Other orchids our found across the track from the Rattle beaks.

Rattle beaks (Lyperanthus serratus)

Rattle beaks (Lyperanthus serratus)

Rattle beaks (Lyperanthus serratus)
Small mantis orchid (Caladenia attingens subsp. gracillima)

Small mantis orchid (Caladenia attingens subsp. gracillima)

Small mantis orchid (Caladenia attingens subsp. gracillima)
Purple enamel orchid (Elythranthera brunonis)

Purple enamel orchid (Elythranthera brunonis)

Purple enamel orchid (Elythranthera brunonis)
Heberle’s spider orchid (Caladenia heberleana)

Heberle’s spider orchid (Caladenia heberleana)

Heberle’s spider orchid (Caladenia heberleana)

Now to check out some further areas of this large reserve. We come across some more varied spider and sun orchids which may be different species, hybrids or just colour variants. Other orchids new for the day were also found and I will list these first.

Red beaks (Pyrorchis nigricans)

Red beaks (Pyrorchis nigricans)

Red beaks (Pyrorchis nigricans)
Zebra orchid (Caladenia cairnsiana)

Zebra orchid (Caladenia cairnsiana)

Zebra orchid (Caladenia cairnsiana)
Common spider orchid (Caladenia varians)

Common spider orchid (Caladenia varians)

Common spider orchid (Caladenia varians)
Esperance white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. crassa)

Esperance white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. crassa)

Esperance white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. crassa)

Now for pics of the varied spider and sun orchids found.

Helms Arboretum rarely disappoints.

11/09/2021 ….. Chirelillup Nature Reserve to Jerramungup

Chirelillup NR, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Road Trip, Toompup NR, Warperup East NR, Western Australian Orchids

After a cool night, instead of packing up camp straight after breakfast, we go exploring the reserve, whilst the camper dries out. I had seen lots of orchids on my quick scout yesterday and now looked forward to having the time to explore with Debbie.

CHIRELILLUP NATURE RESERVE

As per last night the very first orchid found is the Green spider orchid (Caladenia falcata). Also commonly known as the Fringed Mantis orchid.

Then we stumble across a newly named orchid. The Little frog greenhood (Pterostylis occulta) was named in 2021 from specimens collected in 2005, west of Brookton. It is distinguished from P. sargentii by the shape and hairiness of the horn-like structures of the labellum.

Then an old favourite appears just asking us to take a photo. The Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) comes in varied shades of yellow. Then the reddish markings can be bold or pale and be dots or lines and everything in between.

Another yellow orchid is then spotted. Donkey orchids are another orchid that can be difficult to identify, as they are all so similar in appearance and overlap in their recorded locations. For this reason I will not attempt to name the ones found here.

Well I find donkey orchids hard to identify, now I need to try and identify spider orchids from the filamentosa complex. I believe some to be the Common spider orchid (Caladenia varians) whilst others may be the Joseph’s spider orchid (Caladenia polychroma) as both are recorded as being located in the Shire of Gnowangerup, and the features seem to match the reference books

An exciting find was the Purple-veined spider orchid (Caladenia doutchiae) which is found between Mullewa and Raventhorpe. The long tapers to the sepals distinguish it from other related orchids.

A common inland orchid is the Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata) however only a few were found at this location. Also found was the ever reliable Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva), again not in great numbers though.

We ran into some fellow orchid enthusiasts, Martina & Rick, who amazingly follow this blog via Facebook. They shared with us an app on their phone they use to record locations of interest. It also has the ability to overlay geology maps, that show different geology types, which they feel assists them in locating different orchid habitats. I have installed the Australian geology travel maps app and now regularly use it on our excursions.

The camper has now dried out sufficiently so we pack up camp and head off. We detour into Gnowangerup before heading east again. This time we venture into a new location which is not too great a detour off the main track. However we did have to take the Triton and camper through a bit of water to get back to the main Gnowangerup-Jerramungup Road. The water was in the middle of farmland, not the Nature Reserve though.

TOOMPUP NATURE RESERVE

Being a new location, we are excited to see what is found in Toompup Nature Reserve. We pull into an off road parking spot and immediately find some Green spider orchid (Caladenia falcata) which is also referred to as Western mantis orchid. The highly upturned lateral sepals are one of its distinguishing features.

Some small frog greenhoods are located next, however the photos we took are not clear enough to discern the species conclusively. I though, will name them the Little frog greenhood (Pterostylis occulta) due to the sharp of the horn-like structures on the labellum. Please correct me if you think I have erred in this ID.

Some yellow catches our eye. The faithful Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) is found. They certainly brighten up the dull West Australian bush.

Vying for having the most yellow in the bush are the donkey orchids, which are also found en masse. To make life difficult three species are recorded as being found in the Shire of Gnowangerup. I will take a guess that some are the Western wheatbelt donkey orchid (Diuris brachyscapa) and some other ones are the Small flowered donkey orchid (Diuris porrifolia). Florabase mentions D. brachyscapa whilst Atlas of Living Australia lists D. brachyscapa and D. porrifolia as being found in this Nature Reserve.

Well we did find some orchids as a single specimen. A flowering Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva) and Dancing spider orchid (Caladenia discoidea) , a budding Purple enamel orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) and a spent Hare orchid (Leporella fimbriata) were some such finds. Red beaks (Pyrorchis nigricans) and Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata) were found in low numbers.

OK so we find so many different coloured spider orchids from the filamentosa complex that being certain of their identification is proving difficult.

So, I believe most to be the Joseph’s spider orchid (Caladenia polychroma) as they are a common orchid that occurs in variable colours of white, cream, yellow, red and pink. However, the Chameleon spider orchid (Caladenia dimidia) is also a possibility given it occurs in various colours, though it is not currently recorded as occurring in the Gnowangerup LGA.

Some spiders I cannot name are shown opposite. Either the calli are not broad, the colouring seems different, or the size of the flower and labellum don’t fit in with the Joseph’s species. Any help with an ID would be appreciated.

Then to add to the confusion with identification, some hybrids are found together with a lutea or hypochromic specimen.

Parents could be the Purple-veined spider orchid and either Joseph’s or Chameleon spider orchids as both are recorded hybrids.

The lutea or hypochromic specimen appears to be a Joseph’s spider orchid due to the broad calli on the labellum.

Also found were some larger white spider orchids. Now 2 sub-species of C. longicauda are recorded as being found nearby to this location. However, I believe the one I located to be the Stark white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. eminens) due to the broad labellum with long fringe segments.

As with the smaller spider orchids, we also came across a couple that did not appear usual. They could just be variants, given the C. longicauda has 4 or more rows of calli. However, the colouring is not stark white either so if you can help with ID, again that would be appreciated.

Finally, time to move on towards Ongerup where we plan to grab a cuppa at the Malleefowl Centre. We came across some water covering the road, so I jumped out and walked through to test the depth. All good, so Deb pushes through and we arrive at the Yongergnow Malleefowl Centre.

Water covers Cleveland Road, so I jumped out and walked through to test the depth. All good, so Deb pushes through in the mighty Triton.

After another amazing cuppa and icecream we make tracks east towards Jerramungup. However along the Gnowangerup-Jerramungup Road we pull over at a patch of green on the map. It turns out to be Warperup East Nature Reserve. So we jump out the Triton and go exploring this new location.

WARPERUP EAST NATURE RESERVE

First up we find the Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata), which has now been found at all 3 locations visited so far today.

Next up find some orchids of the Pterostylis genus. Most are way past their best, but I took photos just to record they are found at this location. Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva), Banded greenhood (Pterostylis vittata) and Hairy-stemmed snail orchid (Pterostylis setulosa). These orchids all start flowering much earlier in the season.

Other green orchids are found but these belong to the Caladenia genus. First up we find the Small mantis orchid (Caladenia attingens subsp. gracillima), however later on larger flowers are found with longer fringe segments. These could be the Green spider orchid (Caladenia falcata) which occurs as far east as Jerramungup according to my references. The Small mantis orchid is stated as being located as far west as Jerramungup and as we are only 22kms west of Jerramungup both of these species could very well be located here.

Excitedly, we find a new species for the day. The Western tiny blue orchid (Cyanicula aperta) as the name suggests is only 50 – 150mm in height with flowers only 20 – 25mm across. For comparison the Stark white spider orchid is 300 – 600mm in height with flowers 80 -120mm across.

After blue comes the yellow. The reliable Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) is the next orchid to be spotted.

Another yellow orchid is also found. The Western wheatbelt donkey orchid (Diuris brachyscapa) is a common orchid found between York, Tenterden and Ravensthorpe. The lateral sepals are said to be crossed hanging, often reflexed, which my pictures confirm.

A special find for this location was the hybrid orchids found. Three in total were found and I believe they are all the named hybrid, Wheatbelt spider orchid (Caladenia x cala). This is a cross between a White spider orchid (C. longicauda) and a Green spider orchid (C. falcata). Hybrids of C. attingens X C. longicauda are also recorded though un-named.

We then move a little further east before pulling up at the location of Needilup. A quick exploration around then takes place with some familiar orchids being found.

NEEDILUP

Well, we only pull over on the side of the road and explore a few meters in. First orchid to catch our eyes was the donkey orchid. Then a lone 2 headed Jug orchid is found, plus lots of Green spider orchids. I feel these ones are definitely Green spiders and not Small mantises due to the size of the labellum.

No more stops before we reach our final destination for the day. Jerramungup is a welcome sight after a long day orchid hunting. We check into the Jerramungup Motor Hotel and enjoy a good pub feed and a comfortable bed. At least 17 different species found with a few hybrids thrown in. A very pleasing day !!!!

09/08/2020 ….. Corrigin to Dowerin (Road Trip 2020)

Road Trip, Western Australian Orchids

Corrigin Wildflower Trail

After a quick breakfast we break camp and head into Corrigin to top up the Triton. We then head straight out to the Scenic Lookout Drive followed by the Corrigin Wildflower Trail which surrounds the airfield.

Western wheatbelt donkey orchid

(Diuris brachyscapa)

Joseph’s spider orchid

(Caladenia polychroma)

Chameleon spider orchid

(Caladenia dimidia)

Jug orchid

(Pterostylis recurva)

Sugar orchid

(Ericksonella saccharata)

Frog greenhood

(Pterostylis sargentii)

Spider orchid – Hypochromic / lutea form

Hairy-stemmed snail orchid

(Pterostylis setulosa)

Mallee banded greenhood

(Pterostylis arbuscula)

Little pink fairy

(Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans)

Ant orchid, Clown orchid, Man orchid, Jack-in-the-box

(Caladenia roei)

Green spider orchid

(Caladenia falcata)

Unidentified spider orchids

(Caladenia sp.)

After spending a few hours at this location, which included running into a fellow orchid enthusiast, we headed off to Dowerin where we have planned to meet up with Richard, our road trip buddy. We called into Watercarrin (Deb’s grandfather farmed here) and checked out Minnivale before finding Richard at the Dowerin Short Stay Village. We stayed in a chalet which was fortuitous as it rained all afternoon into the night.

Only got to check out near Corrigin today and it was so windy but we found a few orchids. I have posted a video below to show how windy it was today which made getting clear photos very difficult.

2019 Road Trip – Narembeen to Flat Rock Nature Reserve

Numerous days, Road Trip

06/09/2019

Whilst having breakfast we are walking around in the sunshine when I spy what appears to be a black poly pipe coming from the leach drain of the Septic Tank at the back of the toilets. However it then moved and scared the beejesus out of me. I called out to Deb who arrived in time to see it wriggle backwards back into its hole. Whoa we steer clear of that area as we pack up. We drove around the back of the toilets as we left and it was back out, sunning itself. It lifted it’s head to watch us move by.

So we now make our way further east to a place called Roe Dam. The dam was initially planned in 1929 but put off as too costly and was finally built in 1970/71, to provide the Mt Walker farming community with water. The catchment area is 140 acres (56ha) of granite rock and the dam holds 20 million gallons (91 million litres). We pull into the old picnic area as the dam area appears to be out of bounds. This old area has working toilets and shade to park up so all good. First stop for the day so off we go exploring.

First orchids found are the Hairy-stemmed snail orchids (Pterostylis sp. ‘inland’) which as the name suggests are easily identified by their hairy stem. Other than this they are extremely variable in appearance ranging from 50 to 250mm in height, lateral sepals are from 10 to 35mm in length and stem leaves can be 8 to 20mm in length.

Moving towards the granite outcrop we also find a small donkey orchid. This one is much duller than the ones found on previous days. From this it would appear to be the Western wheatbelt donkey orchid (Diuris brachyscapa) which flowers from July to September in locations east of the Albany highway from York down to Tenterden then east to Ravensthorpe. Florabase records the Narembeen shire as one such location.

Then nearby a splash of blue catches our eye. On closer inspection it is a Blue beard (Pheladenia deformis) which is a common orchid found from the Murchison River to Israelite Bay, as well as all the other southern states of Australia. They were originally classified as Caladenia back in 1810, then placed in Pheladenia in 2001.

Another orchid was found in the company of a snail orchid. The Sugar orchid (Ericksonella saccharata) is another common inland orchid, being found from Paynes Find to Israelite Bay. It is a distinctive white flowering orchid with purple lined labellum lobes.

Then just before we reach the granite another type of orchid is found. The Ant orchid (Caladenia roei) is one of the most regularly encountered orchids of the Wheatbelt. It flowers from Eurardy Station to Ravensthorpe during the months August to October. Named in honour of John Septimus Roe, the first surveyor general of WA in 1873.

Upon reaching the granite outcrop, we slowly ascent and find another donkey orchid growing in the vegetated sections of the rock. The bright Yellow granite donkey orchid (Diuris hazeliae) is found again which is not surprising as they range from Paynes Find to Salmon Gums over the months of August and September. It is great to find 2 species of Diuris in the one location.

I get caught up taking lots of photos and Deb gets to scout ahead. She calls out that she has found loads of Little laughing leek orchids (Prasophylum gracile) of both colour variations. So over I trot to grab some photos and there is Deb laying down getting her own shots. These little guys are very widespread and flower over a 4 mth season.

We are now looking down at the dam, which is fenced off so we decide to descend to the woodlands below and make our way back to the picnic area. As soon as we leave the rock and enter the woodlands we discover another spider orchid. This time it is the Drooping spider orchid (Caladenia radialis) which are found from Northampton to Jerramungup during the period August to October. As the name suggests both the petals and sepals usually droop down. We find loads of these orchids throughout the woodlands, many in clumps, which is a feature of this orchid.

Intermixed with all the drooping spider orchids were more Blue beards, Ant orchids and the favourite Jug orchid (Pterostylis recurva) which we have not seen for a while now (Last found 31/8 in Bunbury).

Now there was one special little orchid found which had yet to fully unfurl, but we had to grab a photo or two. It appears to be a hypochromic Drooping spider orchid.

Time to move on, so we jump in the Triton and head south to Hidden Hollow at Mt Walker. First up we have a bite for lunch then decide to take the Hidden Hollow Walk Trail. There is a small dam built at the base of the rock. The sign advises it was built to wash out the hessian bags which were then dried on the rock. This pre-dated the introduction of bulk handling of grain and fertilizer.

We make it to the so called Amphitheatre without sighting any orchids which was disappointing. However in the wet moss on the rocks below this feature Deb finds many more Little laughing leek orchids. Some of them are really dark in colour.

As the rock did not produce much in the way of orchids we decide to make the way back to the parking area via the woodlands at the base of the granite. Within minutes we have found a different orchid. The common Cowslip orchid (Caladenia flava subsp. flava) is found. This is by far the most common and widespread of the four subspecies. In close proximity is the likeable Ant orchid

A little further along we discover one then many more Fringed mantis orchids (Caladenia falcata) which flower from August to October over a range from Wongan Hills to Jerramungup. Distinctive feature are upswept lateral sepals which are narrowly clubbed.

Among all these Fringed mantis orchids are other Ant orchids and a lonely Sugar orchid. Plus some greenhoods were found, however they had finished their flowering and had closed up. Then one was found with two flowers still open and from the colouring, size of plant and number of flowers I believe this to be the Mallee banded greenhood (Pterostylis arbuscula) which flower until early September in inland locations from Northampton to Eyre.

Then to top of our finds we come across some wonderful Caladenia hybrids. The Spectacular spider orchid (Caladenia x spectabilis) is a hybrid between the Cowslip orchids (Caladenia flava) and the Pink fairy (Caladenia latifolia). Narembeen is a location for both these parents so seems fitting we find their babies.

We make it back to the Triton and decide to head off without really knowing where we will stop next. Taking the road back towards Narembeen, we actually miss the town as we come out south of it on the Kondinin-Narembeen Road. We drive through Kondinin and move down towards Kulin, where we decide to check out the below pictured trail again, which is located just out of Kulin.

The trail is around 1.1km in length, so off we trot on our search for orchids. First up we come across some Jug orchids, which are unique in the shape of their flowers. Other common names are: Recurved shell orchid, Antelope orchid and Bull orchid.

Next up we find some small white spider orchids. From the size of the labellum I will be calling these ones the Western wispy spider orchids (Caladenia microchila) which flower from July to October over an inland range of Kondinin to Madura.

Then we move from white spider orchids to green spider orchids. A wonderful pair of Fringed mantis orchids is found. Their leaves were so healthy when compared to other mantis orchids found, so just had to get a photo of them.

Now time to find orchids that are not from the Caladenia genre. Lucky for us the small Frog greenhoods (Pterostylis sargentii) start to appear along the side of the track. Found from Northampton to Grasspatch during the season July to October, the Frog greenhood is a common inland orchid.

Then we find a bevy of orchids of different types within cooee of each other. There is the Sugar orchid, Jug orchid, Mallee banded greenhood and Hairy-stemmed snail orchid.

Whilst jostling around to get the photos a lone speck of pink catches my eye. There is a Little pink fairy (Caladenia reptans subsp. reptans) which cannot be seen from the track, however as I was off the track taking photos it came into view. These little beauties grow from July till October between Northampton and Esperance.

Further along the track a donkey orchid appears. Then others show up the more we explore. The ID is difficult as the single one appears bright yellow with dark markings, which is akin to the Yellow granite donkey orchid, however the mutli flowered one is paler with lighter marking so appears to be the Western wheatbelt donkey orchid. Florabase records Kulin as a location for the later only so I will leave it up to others the help with the positive ID.

Further orchids found, however nothing new so took a few more pics before heading back to the Triton for the final leg of today.

Heading east from Kulin we turn south towards Pingaring to see if there was somewhere to camp overnight. We drove around the edge of the bush block that incorporated the golf course and Nature Reserve but there was no obvious place to stay. So back to the Kulin-Holt Rock Road. Heading further east we finally pull into a gravel pit at the edge of Flat Rock Nature Reserve. This will be our camp for the night.

So today was very much unplanned but we found loads of orchids, which is great. We found 15 species, 1 hybrid and 1 hypochromic orchid, so definitely one of our better days this trip. After a beautiful sunset we hit the sack.

2019 Road Trip – Burakin to Beringbooding Rock

Datjoin Well and Rock, Mollerin (Lake) NR, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Other Reserves, Road Trip

04/09/2019

Waking up to a beautiful sunny morning I take a quick check of the scrub behind Mary-lou’s property. I find a small spider orchid so grab a quick photo with my Samsung phone. I then head back to enjoy breakfast and a nice hot shower. Quick photo shoot with Ian and Mary-lou before I take Deb and Mary-lou back to the orchid I found. Another quick check before it is time to make tracks again.

This orchid appears to be the Common spider orchid (Caladenia vulgata) due to the size of the labellum. These orchids flower over a large range from Kalbarri to Esperance during the months July to early-October.

No other orchids founds, so we bid farewell to Burakin and make our way east along the Bonnie Rock-Burakin Road. Checking out the Hema Map we decide to detour to Mollerin (Lake) Nature Reserve. Firstly we venture down Chapman Road to the reserve but there is no real access so we make the decision to back-track and hit the reserve via the Kulja-Mollerin Rock road, which turned out to be a fortuitous decision. On the track into the parking area we spy orchids from the vehicle. Pulling over we jump out to grab some photos and have a quick scout around.

First up Deb finds some Drooping spider orchids (Caladenia radialis) which occur mostly inland from Northampton to Jerramungup, flowering from August to early-October. The drooping nature of the petals, lateral sepals and usually the dorsal sepal confirms the common name.

Nearby are two colour variations of the Ant orchid (Caladenia roei), greenish-yellow and red. These little guys can grow to 300mm in height and rare specimens have 3 flowers per orchid. They are known to hybridise with many other Caladenia orchids.

Also found were some donkey orchids. The bright yellow colouring and the location points to the Yellow granite donkey orchid (Diuris hazeliae). Found near inland granite and breakaway habitat from Paynes Find to Salmon gums, flowering during the months of August and September.

Mixed in with these three different species were a couple of wispy spider orchids. Choosing between a few possible species I am going to call them the Outback spider orchid (Caladenia remota subsp. remota), due to the larger labellum, creamy colouring and location found.

Then unexpectedly we came across an old concrete sheep dipping station. These were built by the Shire of Koorda in 1944 as shared facilities for local farmers, financed by the Agricultural Bank. It was after grabbing some photos that we decided to quickly move back to the Triton and move on to the parking/camping area at the base of the Mollerin rock.

Now to check out the rock for some orchids. We cover quite a bit of the rock but only manage to find more Yellow granite donkey orchids.

It is not until we reach flat ground at the base of the rock do we find anything different. First up we discover some Blue beards (Pheladenia deformis), however getting a good picture of them proved challenging due to the wind. Also nearby another blue orchid is found. The Dainty blue orchid (Cyanicula amplexans) is found growing rather spindly in the green ferns under the shrubs. Struggled for a good picture of this as well. Both orchids are common inland species and flower as late as October, however their seasons start in May and August respectively.

Many, many more Drooping spider orchids where found with the occasional Yellow granite donkey orchid and Ant orchid thrown in. Some more pictures taken before we decide it is best we move on.

Leaving Mollerin Rock we head back to the Bonnie Rock Burakin Road and head east. Using the Wheatbelt Way Trail map as a guide we stop at the Datjoin Well & Rock Reserve, as a possible overnight stay. Whilst we make our mind up if we will stay here the night we decide to have a quick look around after having a cuppa. Straight up we some Ant orchids in the camping area/picnic area. These two provide a visual of the variations in colour these orchids are found.

Close by some wispy spider orchids are found. These guys are always so difficult to ID. These ones appear to be more Common spider orchids which are commonly found in clumps.

Moving into the surrounding open woodlands another Ant orchid is found, however this one is a very reddish colour with striped labellum. So what is it? After checking into my written and online references, plus asking fellow orchid enthusiasts, I confirm this little beauty is a hybrid between the Ant orchid and either the Drooping spider orchid or Common spider orchid. Due to the mostly red colouring I feel the other parent must be the Drooping spider orchid, so will be calling this orchid Caladenia radialis X Caladenia roei.

Also found as single specimens were the Blue beards, which are also referred to as Blue fairy orchid.

The most numerous orchid found was the Pink candy orchid (Caladenia hirta subsp. rosea) which is a widespread orchid found mostly inland from Kalbarri to Israelite Bay. Flowering season is also quite long, from late-June to September. They range in colour from pale to deep pink, however we found one that was white. This one lacked the pink colour, so is a hypochromic specimen which some refer to as lutea.

Finally moved over to check out the well and go for a short walk up to the rock. Close to the well we came across more Drooping spider orchids in good clumps. On the rock however we only came across some donkey orchids. Location should point to them being further Yellow granite donkey orchids, however the lateral sepals are just hanging, so I will leave the naming to others. Feel free to offer your thoughts.

Well, it is now after 4 and we need to decide if we will camp here the night. The camp ground here is rather small and uneven and there is already a caravan set up, so we decide to move on to the next camping stop on the Wheatbelt Way. Beringbooding Rock provides much more space to camp so we set up the camper, collect wood and start the fire, then enjoy a well earned rest.

Another wonderful day spend it the great outdoors. 8 orchid species found plus 1 hybrid and 1 hydrochromic orchid.

2019 Road Trip – Bedfordale to Caron Dam Reserve via Lake Indoon

Caron Dam, Depot Hill NR, Dookanooka NR, Lake Logue NR, Nature Reserves, Numerous days, Other Reserves, Road Trip

01/09/2019

Waking up a bit better than expected after a heavy night socialising we enjoy a cooked breakfast then thanking our hostess, Sandy, we head off to catch up with family for the day. After spending the day with family, we head off from Deb’s brother’s place in Attadale around 3pm and make our way north. At 5.30 we pull into Caltex at Cataby where we enjoy a huge roast dinner, before heading up to Lake Indoon where we set up the camper and have a good nights sleep.

02/09/2019

Waking up to a crisp morning I take a quick check down the track we had parked near. I spied a couple of nice White spider orchids so went back to have breakfast feeling blessed to be in the great outdoors with orchids waiting to be found. There are many campers at Lake Indoon however not to many seem to be looking in the bush so when we finally head off on our hunt, we do so in peace. (Mud Map N 13a, 13b)

I immediately head back to my White spider orchids whilst Deb finds a great patch of Cowslips (Caladenia flava subsp. flava). The spotted markings pointed to the Kalbarri cowslips orchids but the red lines and southerly location do not support this, unfortunately.

Now my White spider orchids could be one of 3 sub-species found in our current location. Ok so I believe some of the White spider orchids found were Daddy long-legs white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. borealis) due to the labellum having very long fringe segments.

Others seem to be Coastal white spider orchids (Caladenia longicauda subsp. calcigena) due the the labellum calli moving out of rows into irregular agglomerations. The labellum is relatively narrow which is very evident in a hypochromic specimen found.

The third sub species found in this location is the Small-lipped white spider orchid (Caladenia longicauda subsp. albella) which is similar but smaller to Daddy long-legs, however prefers damper situations and has been known to grow with the base of the stem in water.

All 3 subspecies flower during September and include Eneabba or thereabouts in their listed distributions, so I am happy to believe I found all 3 this time round.

Back in 2016 we paid Lake Indoon our first visit and an unusual orchid was found everywhere, however we were getting worried we missed it this time. However the Arrowsmith spider orchid (Calaedenia crebra) starts to show itself finally. These orchids flower in August and September, in limited near coastal locations, between Jurien Bay and Dongara.